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20110301
20110331
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just because they are using the product and they are liking it and sharing with friends and oh, by the way, they will get paid for sharing it with their friends. >> they originally thought about using internet advertising but the users were actually the most effective marketers. >> we found that that personal touch was both important because it's a technology tool but also because that's how many people, you know, take on something new. >> they created a compensation system that rewarded people for selling plum life subscriptions and for recruiting new plum life sellers. >> look, we're going to pay you and pay you well for your time and effort in helping us spread the word about plum life, but this is not where you're going to make $1 million. you set your hours. you do what you want. we'll provide you the tools which are as much training us a want. >> well, welcome to a plum life workshop. >> plum life holds weekly meetups which are informal training sessions where prospective users and sellers come together to learn about the service. director of sales elizabeth mccormick lea
anything was amazing. she made it difficult for us to find thing a lot of times i would never see my bank statements. i would ask for them. you would get busy or whatever and it would never happen. >> over the course of almost two years, theresa, the bookkeeper, had been stealing from the company in a variety of ways. from taking additional payroll checks to fraudulently using a signature stamp. most significantly, she was using payments intended for vendors to pay off her personal credit cards. she altered the entries in the businesses accounting records to cover her track. >> it seems like we were never able to pay everybody up to date especially credit cards. >> meanwhile, the wilsons were working frantically to survive amidst a recession and pinpoint why their seemingly healthy business was struggling to make ends meet. >> we had lots of big events that would, you know, bring in a lot of money. and even after that event, it was like we never had enough money to pay all the bills. >> thought it was the coffee shop, thought we were overstaffed, ordering too much. we looked at every depa
's board of directors. jerry silverman joins us again. the founder and ceo of corporate turnaround. a group that helps business owners restructure their debt. and jeffrey haze let, former ceo of kodak. business consulting company. and he's author of the book "the mirror test." great to see both of you. >> good to be here. >> when we you will get your do back. i would question using the same name for both business >> their point, though, is that by using the same name we are providing something that nobody else does. nobody else in this area has, you know, the association with dog sleds, nobody else has the restaurant that has an this extra benefit. aren't they getting a benefit of having the same name? >> he's clearly -- he clearly has passion about what he does. he uses words like magical and love and freedom. i understand he is passionate. when you are in business, you are in business to make money. i have to say that passion is one of the biggest reasons why small businesses fail. people, entrepreneurs, get into business because they are passionate about what they do. but then they get i
, why are people from london calling us. turns out britney had taken the bag and 48 hours later was in london running around town with this bag. that's how, you know, word-of-mouth -- next thing you knew we were in london. that's even more expensive, isn't it? >> yeah, this one's more expensive. >> while cara has a bag and an impressive line of stars to wear the bags, more impressive is the p.r. budget she used to get the press. >> my public relations budget when i starred was zero. no money. there was no budget. was me, which i didn't pay myself. so there was no money. >> that's not exactly true. at first, cara spent thousands making a costly mistake which taught her she was better off not spending any money. >> it was a $it,000 lesson. -- $3,000 lesson. i don't know that i want to have many more lessons that cost me $3,000. >> the mistake was hiring a big-time p.r. narm promise today to contact celebrities like demi moore and give them sample bags with a handwritten bag from cara. >> i would write a note, "dear demi moore, this is why you should wear this bag." we gave away ba
back. i would question using an the same name for both businesses. >> their point is by uing the same name, we are providing something that nobody else in in area does. nobody has the association with dog sleds, nobody else has this restaurant that has this extra benefit. so in some ways respect they getting a benefit out of having the same name? >> he clearly has passion what he does. he mentions words like magical and love and freedom. i understand that he's passionate. when you're in business, you're in business to make money. i have to say that passion is one of the biggest reasons why small businesses fail. people, entrepreneurs get into business because they're passionate about what they do, but then they get into business and realize it's not that easy and they can't make a profit. >> yeah. i must say that when people say to me follow your passion and it's not followed by something else, i kind of roll my eyes. >> passion without a plan is a big mistake. this guy has a plan. it's working for him we're second-guessing what he's do but it was raised there are some issues. . i thi
and that would be very bad news for small businesses and the entire u.s. economy. >> and, todd, what are you seeing from your vantage point? is this something small businesses should worry about are for the long term? >> i think it's difficult for small businesses to pass on those costs to their customers. inflation was the number one issue if you look at the surveys. that kind of -- we've seen both insurance costs and more recently poor sales and access to credit being big issues but inflation is definitely something that small businesses are worried about particularly to the extent if they can't pass those on to their consumers. >> let's talk about someone who actually runs a business. you run a car dealership. >> yes. >> if it's going to affect anyone, it's going to affect you. are you feeling the pain yet? >> we see it firsthand in buyers' buying decisions. not really hurting us at the same time but i think small business owners coming in who may have opted for a large suv or larger truck might go to something smaller. the real question is, are gas prices going to stay here or is this ju
for a very long time. that would be very bad news for small business and the entire u.s. economy. >> chad, what do you see from your vantage point? is this something small businesses should be worried about? >> it is very difficult for small businesses to pass on those costs to the customers and i know the last time this happened a couple of years ago, inflation was the number one issue for almost all small businesses if you look at the surveys. that kind of, you know, we have seen both insurance costs and more recently poor sales and access to credit being the big iss issues. inflation is definitely smg small businesses are worried about to the extent if they can't pass this on to the consumeers. >> let's talk about someone who runs a business right now. cameron, you run a car dealership. it is going to affect anyone, it is going to affect you. are you feeling the pain yet? >> we see it firsthand in customers' buying decisions, not necessarily hurting us at the same time. i think small business owners that are coming in and may have opted for, you know, large suv or larger truck, they ma
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7